Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 16th Annual World Congress on Pediatrics New York, USA.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Professor James Oleske

Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, USA

Keynote: Combining Touch with Technique: Fusing Technology with the Art of Medicine

Time : 09:00 to 18:00

Pediatrics 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Professor James Oleske  photo
Biography:

Dr. James M. Oleske, M.D., MPH, the François-Xavier Bagnoud Professor of Pediatrics at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ and Director Division of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology and Infectious Diseases. He graduated from the College of Medicine & Dentistry of NJ and received a MPH from Columbia University. He completed a Pediatric residency and a fellowship in Ambulatory Pediatrics at the Harrison S Martland Hospital in Newark, NJ  and a National Cancer Institute fellowship at Emory University and CDC, Atlanta, GA. He is board certified in Pediatrics, Allergy and Immunology, Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Pain Management, Hospice and Palliative Care.
 

Abstract:

It does not take long walking through a modern hospital to appreciate how much the practice of medicine is influenced by advanced technology that impacts diagnosis and treatment as well as greatly enhancing overall patient outcomes. This technology has allowed us to increase diagnostic efficiency and accuracy as well as managing complex illnesses. However, these advances in diagnosis and medical/surgical management have sometimes led to a sacrifice in the patient-doctor relationship that has impeded patient’s perception of personal interaction and care leading to a climate of distance and distrust. Ultimately, if a patient is diagnosed correctly with minimal care and compassion, have we truly met our responsibilities as physicians? Lacking in the current teaching of medicine is often an explicit discussion of the importance of touch as a therapeutic modality rather than just a consequence of a thorough physical examination. Allopathic medicine would do well to incorporate the basic principles of osteopathic medicine’s emphasis on touch in the everyday practice of medicine. Physicians can provide compassionate care only when empathy is present, which is reinforced by direct contact with patients. Technology should be used to supplement, not replace, the physician-patient relationship. The great challenge in medicine is not in the learning of our professional skills, rather it is in its competent and compassionate administration within the confines of the modern medical world. Within the constant spectre of disease and its complications, our central role as physicians is to blend the technology to diagnose and treat with the compassion and imperative to relieve suffering and by doing so, adding to the joy of life.

Keynote Forum

Professor Raphael David

New York University School of Medicine, USA

Keynote: CONGENITAL ADRENAL HYPERPLASIA: AN UPDATE

Time : 09:00 to 18:00

Pediatrics 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Professor Raphael David photo
Biography:

Dr Raphael David is working as a Full Professor at New York University, USA.

Abstract:

A historical perspective of Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (CAH) will encompass the evolution of diagnostics and therapies so as to put current clinical investigation and treatment into context. Recent advances in related genetic mutations for effective management will be discussed. Attendees will understand applicable adjunctive therapies such as Gonadotropin Hormone Agonists and Growth Hormone for effective care. Prenatal diagnosis and therapy including the use of cell free DNA will be reviewed.

Pediatrics 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Professor Lawrence Dean Frenkel  photo
Biography:

Lawrence D. Frenkel, MD is an academic pediatrician, infectious disease specialist, and immunologist who has devoted himself to clinical care, teaching, research and advocacy for children as well as to service to his colleagues, for over four decades.  Dr. Frenkel graduated from the State University of New York at Buffalo in 1965, with a BA degree in Chemistry.  He received his MD degree in 1969 from the Georgetown University School of Medicine and did a residency in Pediatrics at The New York Hospital/Cornell medical Center.  He served in the US Public Health Service as Associate Medical Officer of the Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health.  Thereafter he did a Fellowship in Immunology, Allergy and Pediatric Infectious Diseases at Georgetown. His past academic and clinical appointments include:  Director of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Division at the Medical College of Ohio, Director of the Division of Immunology, Allergy, and infectious Diseases and Director of the Pediatric Aids Program at the UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, and Professor and Chairman of Pediatrics at the University of Illinois College of Medicine-Rockford. He was invited to visit, present research, teach, and lecture in over 50 countries.  He has presented and published over 150 peer-reviewed papers and is himself an editor and reviewer for a score of renowned publications.

Abstract:

The main pathogens associated with congenital infection and affliction,  with a focus on Zika virus, which are often manifest with microcephaly are briefly reviewed.  Aspects of maternal infection are noted.  The epidemiology and manifestations of infections in non-pregnant hosts, the pregnant woman, and in the fetus are described.  The pathology of microcephaly is reviewed in detail with a discussion of the neuropathogenesis of congenital Zika virus infection.  Further, the innate and adaptive immune mechanisms in the pregnant woman and fetus, including changes at the maternal-fetal interface and induction of fetal tolerance will be described.  Finally hypotheses which might explain why:  some infants are not infected in the presence of primary maternal infection, while others acquire subclinical infection, but still others are severely afflicted, are discussed.  These hypotheses include pathogen strain differences, tropism to developing fetal tissues, the role of various subsets of maternal immunity, and aspects of fetal immune responses.

Keynote Forum

Dr James B. McCarthy

Pace University, USA

Keynote: Pediatric Psychotic Disorders and the Role of Psychotherapy

Time : 09:00 to 18:00

Pediatrics 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Dr James B. McCarthy photo
Biography:

He is working at Department of Psychology, Pace University  New York University Child Study Center, New York, USA . His international experience includes various programs, contributions and participation in different countries for diverse fields of study.  His research interests reflect in his wide range of publications in various national and international journals.

Abstract:

Psychotic symptoms are moderately widespread in child and adolescent psychiatric disorders and are somewhat frequent in children who have been the victims of maltreatment by adults. The incidence of discreet psychotic symptoms among children and adolescents in the United States is between 8% and 9% of the general population.  Aside from psychotic symptoms associated with medical conditions, psychotic manifestations of severe mood disorders, such as Major Depressive Disorder or Bipolar Disorder have the greatest frequency in addition to the intermittent psychotic features associated with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in highly traumatized children and youth. There have been groundbreaking advances in understanding the genetics, neurobiology, etiology and developmental course of psychotic disorders in children and adolescents as well as the appropriate utilization of antipsychotic medications. However, psychotic disorders often interrupt cognitive, social and emotional development in children and adolescents leading to noticeably compromised functioning. Several studies colleagues and I and other investigators have conducted suggest that children and adolescents with psychotic features associated with mood disorders have greater cognitive deficits than those who have mood disorders without psychotic features; in addition, cognitive and social declines in children and adolescents with schizophrenia have been well documented. Although there are developmental differences in the symptoms of psychotic disorders and there is considerable variability in the outcome of patients with pediatric psychotic disorders, there is a continuity of psychotic disorders from childhood to adolescence to adulthood. There is thus a critical need for research on the role of psychotherapy, supportive services and cognitive interventions that may help to improve the functioning of very high risk children and those with psychotic disorders. Individual psychotherapy approaches with psychotic children aim to improve reality testing, coping skills and anxiety tolerance while examining the stimuli for the exacerbations of their experience of stress and anxiety.  Studies on family-based psychotherapeutic interventions consistently point to the need for supporting family members and their efforts to try to restore the psychotic child’s age-appropriate functioning.

  • General Pediatrics | Pediatric Neurology | Neonatal/Pediatric Intensive & Critical Care | Pediatric Cardiology | Pediatric Endocrinology | Pediatric Gastroenterology | Pediatric Psychology | Pediatric Pulmonology | Pediatric Rheumatology